Canada

Canadian Government Announces its Response to the Bedford Decision

After months of speculation, the Canadian government yesterday announced its plans for new legislation around sex work.

My Work Should Not Cost Me My Life: A Report on the Consequences of Canada's Introduction of the “Nordic Model”

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(c) Pivot Legal Society

Since December 20, 2013 when the Supreme Court of Canada struck down three of the country’s most harmful prostitution laws (the communication, bawdy house, and living on the avails laws) in what was known as the Canada v. Bedford Case, there has been intense speculation over what new legislation, when it is enacted, will look like.

Sex Workers in Canada Decry Government Consultation on Sex Work

The following is press release from NSWP member, Maggie's Toronto Sex Workers Action Project

Monday, June 2, 2014 — Maggie’s – Toronto Sex Workers’ Action Project, along with sex workers and other experts, question the legitimacy of the federal government online consultation around prostitution in Canada.

Sex Work and the Charter

Download this resource: 
Year: 
2013

This detailed resource looks at the Canadian legal system and hierachy of laws from the perspective of launching a court case to prrotect the rights of sex workers. It discusses the Canadian law and your rights, the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, limits to the Charter, and how to challenge unconstitutional laws.

Canadians Await Decision by Supreme Court on Decriminalisation

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Contrary to popular misconception, sex work is legal in Canada; the act of exchanging sex for money is not a criminal offence. What is illegal are several activities fundamentally related to sex work, namely, communicating for the purposes of prostitution, (CC s. 213-1c); owning, operating, or occupying a "bawdy house" used for prostitution (CC s. 210); and procuring or living on the avails of prostitution (CC s. 212-1j). These three laws are currently being reconsidered in the Bedford v. Canada Supreme Court hearing, which took place on June 13th. 

The case began in Ontario in 2007, with three applicants: Terri-Jean Bedford, a dominatrix whose S&M dungeon was shut down in 1999 under the Bawdy House law; and two members of Sex Professionals of Canada (SPOC), Amy Lebovitch and Valerie Scott. Together, they challenged the three sections of the Federal law on the grounds that these provisions violate sex workers' right to liberty and security of person, granted under the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, section 7. The Communication Law also violates sex workers' Charter right to freedom of expression, section 2b.