Legislation and Policy

Sex Work Digest - Issue 9

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Year: 
2014

This is the 9th issue of NSWP's quarterly newsletter ‘Sex Work Digest’. 

This special issue includes coverage of the International AIDS Conference 2014 in Melbourne.

This resource is in English.  You can download this 14 page PDF above.

Apologies that we ommitted to feature the recipients of the Robert Carr Research Award, presented at IAC 2014, in this issue.  A full article about the award recipients will appear in the next issue.  The research project Sex Work and Violence: Understanding Factors for Safety and Protection was selected as the first recipient of the award. The project is overseen by a regional steering committee that included the Centre for Advocacy on Stigma and Marginalisation , the Asia Pacific Network of Sex Workers, the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), UN Population Fund (UNFPA), the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS), and Partners for Prevention, which is a joint UN initiative working on gender-based violence.

The research report itself is due to be launched in December 2014.

The Swedish Law to Criminalise Clients: A failed experiment in social engineering

Year: 
2012

In 1999, the Swedish government embarked on an experiment in social engineering1 to end men’s practice of purchasing commercial sexual services. The government enacted a new law criminalizing the purchase (but not the sale) of sex (Swedish Penal Code). It hoped that the fear of arrest and increased public stigma would convince men to change their sexual behaviour. The government also hoped that the law would force the estimated 1,850 to 3,000 women who sold sex in Sweden at that time to find another line of work.

Germany: the federal government plans to introduce compulsory registration for all sex workers

A group of sex workers in Germany have released a statement decrying the German Minister for Family Affairs putting forth proposals for the mandatory registration of all sex workers in Germany.

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Canadian Sex Workers Rally in Opposition to C-36

As the Canadian government rushes to push through Federal Bill C-36, their proposed new sex work legislation, before their December deadline, the Senate's legal and constitutional affairs committee will be meeting on Tuesday, September 9th to discuss it.

Sex Workers Left Out of Canadian Government’s C-36 Discussions

In the months since the Canadian government introduced its proposal for new legislation around sex work, Justice Minister Peter MacKay has been touring the country, holding closed-door meetings with what his department calls “criminal justice system stakeholders.” While the exact identity of those consulted remains unclear, one thing is likely: none of them were sex workers, the very people the government’s

Canadian Parliament Begins Weeklong Hearings on C-36

As the December deadline to create a new prostitution law in Canada approaches, parliament is reconvening during its summer recess for a packed schedule of hearings by the House of Commons justice committee.

German Sex Worker Organisation BesD responds to Bundesrat Resolution about Prostitution Act Reform

In 2002 Germany enacted the Prostitution Reform Act with the aim of strengthening the social and legal rights of sex workers.  On 11th April 2014, the Bundesrat, the Upper House of the German Parliament, called for further debate on the sex work laws and proposed a number of new measures.  German sex worker organisation BesD, Trade Association Erotic and Sexual Services, has issued a statement in response, expressing deep concern over some of the suggested reforms.

Sexuality and Social Justice: a Toolkit

Year: 
2014

A number of people are excluded from the process and benefits of development because of their sexuality. Policies designed to lift people out of poverty, to provide employment and access to crucial services, all too often exclude those who do not conform to ‘normal’ sexual or gender identities. In many countries, this exclusion is also enforced through law.