Recursos: Labour

Resultados 1 - 10 de 14

Resultados

Following a global consultation with members, the NSWP Consensus Statement reaffirms NSWP ’s
global advocacy platform for sex work, human rights and the law. The Consensus Statement is issued on behalf of NSWP members and the sex workers they represent including sex workers of all genders, class, race, ethnicity, health status, age, nationality, citizenship, language, education levels, disabilities, and many other factors.

The statement covers eight rights:

Following a global consultation with members, the NSWP Consensus Statement reaffirms NSWP ’s
global advocacy platform for sex work, human rights and the law. The Consensus Statement is issued on behalf of NSWP members and the sex workers they represent including sex workers of all genders, class, race, ethnicity, health status, age, nationality, citizenship, language, education levels, disabilities, and many other factors.

The statement covers eight rights:

The criminalisation of sex workers’ clients is often claimed to be part of a new legal framework to eradicate sex work and trafficking by ‘ending demand’. In 1999, Sweden criminalised sex workers’ clients and maintained the criminalisation of third parties such as brothel-owners, managers, security and support staff. The individual selling of sex remained legal. This model is frequently referred to as the ‘Swedish’, ‘Nordic’ or ‘End Demand’ model. There is great pressure in many countries to advance such legal and policy measures. The damaging consequences of this model on sex workers’ health, rights and living conditions are rarely discussed.  

The criminalisation of sex workers’ clients is often claimed to be part of a new legal framework to eradicate sex work and trafficking by ‘ending demand’. In 1999, Sweden criminalised sex workers’ clients and maintained the criminalisation of third parties such as brothel-owners, managers, security and support staff. The individual selling of sex remained legal. This model is frequently referred to as the ‘Swedish’, ‘Nordic’ or ‘End Demand’ model. There is great pressure in many countries to advance such legal and policy measures. The damaging consequences of this model on sex workers’ health, rights and living conditions are rarely discussed.  

The conflation of trafficking and migration with sex work, in law and practice, presents challenges to NSWP.

This NSWP briefing paper explains how sex work is conflated with trafficking; the legal framework; how demand for sex work is conflated with trafficking; the dangers of conflating trafficking with sex work, its impacts on sex workers’ lives and work; the impact on sex worker programming; and offers some recommendations for policy makers, donors and for civil society. 

The conflation of trafficking and migration with sex work, in law and practice, presents challenges to NSWP.

This NSWP briefing paper explains how sex work is conflated with trafficking; the legal framework; how demand for sex work is conflated with trafficking; the dangers of conflating trafficking with sex work, its impacts on sex workers’ lives and work; the impact on sex worker programming; and offers some recommendations for policy makers, donors and for civil society. 

This is the Spanish version of the Specialist Submission, by the UNAIDS Advisory Group on HIV and Sex Work, to the Global Commission on HIV and the Law.

The Global Commission is an independent commission, convened on behalf of UNDP and the UNAIDS family, advised by a Technical Advisory Group (TAG).  The Commission is looking at 4 key areas:

This is the Spanish version of the Note for Record of the July 2011 UNAIDS Advisory Group on HIV and Sex Work Teleconferences

This document details the events of the group teleconferences, including:

  • UN High Level meeting on AIDS
  • WHO Guidelines Development
  • World Bank Global Analysis of HIV in Sex Workers
  • Global Commission on HIV and the Law

You can download this 5 page PDF resource above. This resource is in Spanish.

This is the Spanish version of the Note for Record of the April 2011 UNAIDS Advisory Group on HIV and Sex Work Teleconferences.