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What do sex workers think about the French Prostitution Act?

In 2016, France adopted a law criminalising the clients of sex workers. This report focuses on the impact of this new legislation on the health, rights and living conditions of sex workers in the country. 

This report is available in English, and available in French on the Médecins du Monde website

 

Shadow Report Guidelines on CEDAW and Rights of Sex Workers

This document aims to provide guidance to nongovernmental organisations engaging with the CEDAW review process and providing alternative information to the CEDAW Committee on the theme of rights of sex workers. It accompanies the Framework on Rights of Sex Workers & CEDAW as a practical tool to aid documentation and analysis using the CEDAW Convention as a frame of reference.

Framework on Rights of Sex Workers and CEDAW

This Framework seeks to connect human rights principles to the debates around prostitution laws and sex work. It is intended to be a tool to inform the rights discourse on sex work in the context of one such international human rights treaty— the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW).

Community Guide: Sex Workers’ Access to Comprehensive Sexual and Reproductive Health Services

This resource is a Community Guide to the Briefing Paper on Sex Workers’ Access to Comprehensive Sexual and Reproductive Health Services. It provides an overview of the full Briefing Paper, and provides key recommendations for policy makers and health service providers. 

You can download this 5-page Community Guide above. This resource is available in English, and will be available in Chinese, French, Russian and Spanish soon. 

Briefing Paper: Sex Workers’ Access to Comprehensive Sexual and Reproductive Health Services

Globally sex workers experience a number of barriers to comprehensive sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services, ranging from explicit exclusion from international financing to discrimination within SRH services leading to lower access rates.

This paper discusses the obstacles sex workers face when accessing SRH services, and examines the quality of services available to them. It also provides practical examples and recommendations for improving the accessibility and acceptability of SRH services for sex workers.

'Body Politics: Criminalization of Sexuality and Reproduction' Series

Amnesty International's 'Body Politics: Criminalization of Sexuality and Reproduction' series is the culmination of six years of research, analysis and engagement with key partners. See below for an overview of the resources, which you can download through the link above. 

The series has three components:

Policy Brief: The Impact of ‘End Demand’ Legislation on Women Sex Workers

A growing number of countries are considering or implementing sex work law reform focusing on ‘ending demand’, which criminalises the purchase of sexual services. This Policy Brief outlines the impact of ‘end demand’ legislation on the human rights of female sex workers, through research and testimony from NSWP members in countries where paying for sex is criminalised. This document explores how these laws not only fail to promote gender equality for women who sell sex, but actively prevent the realisation of their human rights.

Community Guide: Migrant Sex Workers

This resource is a Community Guide to the Briefing Paper: Migrant Sex Workers. It provides an overview of the full Briefing Paper, and provides key recommendations for policy makers and health service providers. 

You can download this 5-page Community Guide above. This resource is available in English, and will be available in Chinese, French, Russian and Spanish soon. 

Briefing Paper: Migrant Sex Workers

This Briefing Paper explores the human rights barriers encountered by migrant sex workers as a result of their type of labour. It highlights their lack of access to services, as well as the increased precariousness and exclusion they face due to legal restrictions on cross-border movement and work in the sex industry. This paper also places migrant sex work in the context of international labour migration, using consultation responses from NSWP member organisations.