Where our members work

NSWP’s members are local, national and regional sex worker organisations and networks, across five regions: Africa; Asia and the Pacific; Europe (including Eastern Europe and Central Asia); Latin America and North America and the Caribbean. Members in each region elect two representatives to the NSWP Board of Directors.

All member organisations are required to endorse NSWP’s core values and the Consensus Statement on Sex Work, Human Rights, and the Law. Only sex worker-led organisations and networks have voting rights.

NSWP members are from diverse cultures and have different experiences and organisational histories. Most are independent sex worker-led organisations, some are informal groups of sex workers within larger organisations and some are non-governmental organisations who support sex workers rights. Some member organisations provide services, some focus on advocacy, some on mobilising to reduce vulnerability – all work on human rights issues that affect the health and well-being of sex workers.

You can find our members through the regional pages or by clicking on the red umbrellas on the map.

Note: For both safety and security NSWP does not identify which members are sex worker-led on our website, and members can choose not to be listed on the public website.


 

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Regional updates

5th December 2017 by NSWP | Region: Global

This resource is a Community Guide to the Policy Brief on the Impact of Criminalisation on Sex Workers’ Vulnerability to HIV and Violence. This guide summarises how criminalisation increases sex workers’ vulnerability to violence and HIV, and makes a series of recommendations towards the full decriminalisation of sex work as an integral step to improving the lives of sex workers. The full Policy Brief is available here

5th December 2017 by NSWP | Region: Global

This policy brief examines the impact of laws that criminalise sex work, informed by NSWP members’ submissions to an e-consultation. It examines the impact of criminalisation at three distinct phases: the surveillance and policing of sex workers prior to arrest; arrest and formal involvement of the criminal justice system; and release and return to the community. The paper covers various areas of law and law enforcement practices that disproportionately impact sex workers, including immigration laws, policing of public spaces, anti-LGBTQ laws, HIV criminalisation and religious codes.

29th November 2017 by NSWP | Region: Global

This resource is a Community Guide to the NSWP Briefing Paper on the Meaningful Involvement of Sex Workers in the Development of Health Services Aimed At Them. This Community Guide provides a summary of NSWP’s full Briefing Paper, and provides key recommendations for governments, policy makers and health service programmers. 

29th November 2017 by NSWP | Region: Global

This Briefing Paper discusses the extent to which sex workers are currently meaningfully involved in the development of healthcare services that are aimed at them. The paper looks at this on a global scale and in five regions: Africa, Asia Pacific, Europe, Latin America, and North America and the Caribbean. Case studies were developed based on in-depth research conducted in ten countries: Belgium, Brazil, Cambodia, Ecuador, Ethiopia, Mauritius, Papua New Guinea, Trinidad and Tobago, Ukraine, and the U.S.A.

22nd November 2017 by NSWP | Region: Global

This Smart Guide is a quick reference for sex workers and people who use drugs to help understand the transition from Global Fund financing. ‘Transition’ is the process that happens when Global Fund financing for programmes (for HIV, TB and/or Malaria) comes to an end and the country takes full responsibility for funding and implementing programmes without any external Global Fund support.

18th October 2017 by NSWP | Region: Global

This resource is a Community Guide to the Sex Work and Gender Equality policy brief. It highlights the linkages between sex workers’ rights and gender equality. It argues the women’s movement must meaningfully include sex workers as partners. It advocates for a feminism that recognises sex workers’ rights as human rights and highlights shared areas of work under an international human rights framework.

18th October 2017 by NSWP | Region: Global

This policy brief highlights the linkages between sex workers’ rights and gender equality. It argues the women’s movement must meaningfully include sex workers as partners. It advocates for a feminism that recognises sex workers’ rights as human rights and highlights shared areas of work under an international human rights framework. Ultimately, there can be no gender equality if sex workers’ human rights are not fully recognised and protected. A community guide is also available.

11th October 2017 by NSWP | Region: Global

Este recurso es una Guía Comunitaria sobre el documento informativo de política sobre el Trabajo Sexual como Trabajo. Se resumen los marcos internacionales que abordan el trabajo y el derecho al trabajo, y en particular, el trabajo sexual como trabajo. Muestra los beneficios de ver el trabajo sexual como un trabajo a través de un enfoque laboral. También resume la consulta con los miembros de la NSWP que indaga sobre cómo sería el trabajo decente en el contexto del trabajo sexual.

11th October 2017 by NSWP | Region: Global

Данный ресурс представляет собой пособие для сообщества по аналитической записке "Секс-работа как работа".  Здесь описаны международные правовые рамки, касающиеся труда и права на труд, в частности секс-работы как одного из видов труда.  В нем раскрываются преимущества рассмотрения секс-работы через призму трудовых отношений.  Здесь также приведены результаты обсуждения того, как по мнению членов НСВП, должны выглядеть стандарты достойного труда применительно к секс-работе.

11th October 2017 by NSWP | Region: Global

Cette ressource est un Guide communautaire relatif au document de politique générale Reconnaitre le travail du sexe comme un travail. Il fait l’inventaire des organisations, des traités et des conventions existants sur la scène internationale qui permettent d’examiner la notion de travail, du droit au travail et plus spécifiquement la notion de reconnaissance du travail du sexe comme un travail. Il montre quels sont les avantages de reconnaitre le travail du sexe comme un travail et d’une approche par le biais des droits du travail. Il fait aussi le bilan de la consultation qu’a mené NSWP auprès de ses membres : NSWP leur avait demandé, dans le cadre du travail du sexe, quelles étaient les conditions requises pour travailler dans des conditions décentes.