Resources: Sex Work, Migration, & Mobility

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You can download this 12 page PDF resource above. This resource is in English.

The conflation of trafficking and migration with sex work, in law and practice, presents challenges to NSWP.

This NSWP briefing paper explains how sex work is conflated with trafficking; the legal framework; how demand for sex work is conflated with trafficking; the dangers of conflating trafficking with sex work, its impacts on sex workers’ lives and work; the impact on sex worker programming; and offers some recommendations for policy makers, donors and for civil society. 

The conflation of trafficking and migration with sex work, in law and practice, presents challenges to NSWP.

This NSWP briefing paper explains how sex work is conflated with trafficking; the legal framework; how demand for sex work is conflated with trafficking; the dangers of conflating trafficking with sex work, its impacts on sex workers’ lives and work; the impact on sex worker programming; and offers some recommendations for policy makers, donors and for civil society. 

What's the Cost of a Rumour? 

A guide to sorting out the myths and the facts about sporting events and trafficking

There has been a lot published on the supposed link between sporting events and trafficking, but how much of it is true and how much of it is useful?

This report was commissioned and funded by the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) and
implemented by the Sex Work Education and Advocacy Taskforce (SWEAT). The mixed methods
component of the research also received financial support from Atlantic Philanthropies.
 

This report reflects the voices and opinions of 140 participants, including resource persons and sex workers, at the first Asia and the Pacific Regional Consultation on HIV and Sex Work, held on October 2010 in Pattaya, Thailand. It covers critical components of the HIV and sex work responses, and four key areas – namely, creating an enabling legal and policy environment, ensuring sexual and reproductive health and rights, eliminating violence against sex workers, and addressing migration and mobility in the context of HIV and sex work.

Sex workers are highly mobile populations, moving both within and accross national boundaries, as either documented or undocumented labour.  However, labour laws rarely, if ever, offer protection and benefits to local or migrant sex workers.  Migration and mobility factors that can significantly increase the vulnerability of sex workers to HIV and sexually transmitted infections, in large part due to their undocumented status including lack of work permits, poor working conditions in some cases, lack of access to health care, occupational health and safety standards, and other forms of labour protection. 

Governments and the United Nations have recognised the need to address the legal and policy barriers and stigma and discrimination faced by sex workers in order to respond to the HIV epidemic.  In many countries, laws, policies and practices against sex workers limit their right to basic social economic rights such as access to education, health care, housing, banking facilities, inheritance, property and legal services.  They may also lack citizenship or legal status, resulting from migration or unfavourable regulations, which can lead to exclusion of sex workers from health services, social programmes and communities.

Short report in English of the work of the UNAIDS Advisory Group on HIV and Sex Work during 2010.