Resources

Download this resource: WHO ARV Guidelines 2013.pdf

The World Health Organization (WHO) released new guidelines for earlier treatment of HIV at the International Aids Society Conference 2013.

A fact sheet on the guidelines can be accessed here.

Download this resource: fulltext1 (2).pdf

This article looks at how legalisation came to the netherlands; what it was intended to do, and what the impact has been on sex workers. In order to answer these lines of enquiry, the article examines what discourses frame the major actors in this debate, starting with a historical overview of Dutch sex work policies throughout the 20th century. Having established the socio-political backdrop of the Netherlands' approach to legalised sex work, the resource discusses how legalisation (or regulationism) "did not solve a number of serious problems in the sex industry".

Download this resource: StellaInfoSheetLanguageMatters.pdf

This resource asks the reader to think more carefully and deeply about things we might think we already know; specifically, the language we use to talk about sex work. It reaffirms to a sex working readership that "sex workers are often framed in very simplistic and stereotypical ways that erase the complexity of our realities" and thus, "when our choice of words differs from the beliefs and stereotypes that people have about us, people are quick to discredit us". The text emphasises the centrality of sex working perspectives by assuming a sex working readership, and assuming therefore lived expertise in the nuances of language discussed - without alienating potential non-sex working readers.

There is a growing interest in the evidence that antiretroviral therapy (ART) can be used to prevent or reduce transmission of HIV. The Global Network of People Living with HIV (GNP+) have recently released their position paper on the use of ART as prevention. The paper focuses on what this means for the general population of people living with HIV (at the individual level) and what it means for public health (at the population level).

Download this resource: KDTD_Human_Trafficking_And_Sex_Work.pdf

This concise guide to the difference between sex work and trafficking - and what a response to trafficking grounded in sex worker rights looks like - discusses the key differences between sex work and trafficking; the differences that make the habitual conflation of the two not only inaccurate but also a hinderance to tackling actual exploitation, and a threat to the human rights of sex workers.

Download this resource: A-HRC-23-36-Add1_en.pdf

The report to the UN by the Special Rapporteur on extreme poverty and human rights in Namibia discusses the challenges faced by sex workers, writing "the criminalization of sex work in Namibia lies at the foundation of a climate of stigma, discrimination and violence surrounding sex work".

Download this resource: SW Digest Issue 4 June 2013.pdf

This is the fourth issue of NSWP's quarterly newsletter ‘Sex Work Digest’. 

This resource is in English.  You can download this 6 page PDF above.

Download this resource: sex-work-laws-policies-20120713[1].pdf

This reference text seeks to "clarify terms and illustrate examples of alternatives to the use of criminal law as a response to sex work". It provides capsule definitions - with small case-studies or examples - of what a variety of laws and policies look like in terms of their impact on sex work, covering criminalisation, legalisation, and decriminalisation, along with a mini-discussion of other laws that are used against sex workers, such as the criminalisation of HIV transmission, or immigration enforcement.

Download this resource: criminalizing-condoms-20120717[1].pdf

'Criminalising Condoms' details the experiences of sex workers and outreach services across six countries (Kenya, Namibia, Russia, Zimbabwe, South Africa and the United States). It finds that where any degree of criminalisation exists (whether of sex workers themselves, or of activities relating to sex work), condoms are used as evidence of sex work. This forces sex workers to choose between carrying safer sex supplies, thus attracting the deleterious attentions of the police, or working without condoms in the hope that the police will refrain from harassment - but also without the supplies that would protect them from HIV.

Download this resource: trafficking_web[1].pdf

Emi Koyama draws out links in rhetoric and tactics between the war on terror and the war on trafficking. She addresses three key myths of the anti-trafficking movement: that the average age of initiation into the sex industry is 13; that 100,000 - 300,000 children are 'at risk' of being trafficked into the sex industry annually in the United States, and that one third of 1.6 million runaways are 'sold within 48 hours'. 

Download this resource: Press Release NSWP+ with photo.pdf

Press Release

2nd June 2013

NSWP+ launched to fight for the rights of positive sex workers

June 2nd marked International Sex Workers’ Day. NSWP celebrated this important day by officially launching the NSWP+ platform through a new website: http://www.nswp.org/nswp-plus

This 10th Missing the Target report (MTT10) focuses on challenges to the scale-up of HIV services as required to implement the Treatment 2.0 framework. That framework refers to an initiative developed and proposed in June 2010 by the World Health Organization (WHO) and Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) that aims to “catalyse the next phase of HIV treatment scale-up through promoting innovation and efficiency gains.”

Download this resource: Access_Briefing_TPP_ENG_2013.pdf

Briefing paper produced by Médecins Sans Frontières (Doctors without Borders) that outlines the Trans-Pacific Partnership deal being negotiated between the U.S. and ten other Pacific nations.

Download this resource: NSWP Statement USAID v AOSI Case.pdf

On April 22nd 2013, the U.S. Supreme Court will listen to evidence surrounding the case named USAID v AOSI (Alliance for Open Society International). The case relates to the constitutional status of the anti-prostitution pledge that must be signed by all USAID funding recipients. This pledge is a provision within the United States Leadership Against HIV/AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria Act of 2003 (known as the Leadership Act), which forces sub-grantees to explicitly oppose prostitution in order to qualify for U.S. Government funding to fight HIV and AIDS. The results of this case will have dramatic consequences for NGOs, faith-based groups, civil society, and importantly for NSWP’s members, for sex workers globally.

Download this resource: SW Digest Issue 3 March 2013.pdf

This is the third issue of NSWP's quarterly newsletter ‘Sex Work Digest’. 

This resource is in English.  You can download this 5 page PDF above.

Sex Worker Forum of Vienna, Austria - supplement to the Shadow CEDAW report submitted to the 54th Session of CEDAW February / March 2013.

You can download this 36 page PDF report above.

This resource is in English.

Download this resource: SWFofViennashadow CEDAW 2013.pdf

Sex-Worker Forum of Vienna, Austria - Shadow CEDAW report submitted to the 54th Session of CEDAW February / March 2013.

You can download this 44 page PDF report above.

This resource is in English.

Download this resource: SZEXE shadow CEDAW 54 2013.pdf

SZEXE Shadow CEDAW report submitted to the 54th Session of CEDAW February / March 2013.

You can download this 16 page PDF report above.

This resource is in English.

Tais Plus - Shadow CEDAW report submitted to CEDAW in 2008.

You can download this 5 page PDF report above.

This resource is in English.

Download this resource: SWP shadow CEDAW 2007.pdf

Sex Workers Project at the Urban Justice Center - Shadow CEDAW report submitted to the 39th Session of CEDAW in 2007.

You can download this 13 page PDF report above.

This resource is in English.