Resources: Labour

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This is the 9th issue of NSWP's quarterly newsletter ‘Sex Work Digest’. 

This special issue includes coverage of the International AIDS Conference 2014 in Melbourne.

This resource is in English.  You can download this 14 page PDF above.

Apologies that we ommitted to feature the recipients of the Robert Carr Research Award, presented at IAC 2014, in this issue.  A full article about the award recipients will appear in the next issue.  The research project Sex Work and Violence: Understanding Factors for Safety and Protection was selected as the first recipient of the award. The project is overseen by a regional steering committee that included the Centre for Advocacy on Stigma and Marginalisation , the Asia Pacific Network of Sex Workers, the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), UN Population Fund (UNFPA), the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS), and Partners for Prevention, which is a joint UN initiative working on gender-based violence.

The research report itself is due to be launched in December 2014.

Following a global consultation with members, the NSWP Consensus Statement reaffirms NSWP ’s
global advocacy platform for sex work, human rights and the law. The Consensus Statement is issued on behalf of NSWP members and the sex workers they represent including sex workers of all genders, class, race, ethnicity, health status, age, nationality, citizenship, language, education levels, disabilities, and many other factors.

The statement covers eight rights:

Following a global consultation with members, the NSWP Consensus Statement reaffirms NSWP ’s
global advocacy platform for sex work, human rights and the law. The Consensus Statement is issued on behalf of NSWP members and the sex workers they represent including sex workers of all genders, class, race, ethnicity, health status, age, nationality, citizenship, language, education levels, disabilities, and many other factors.

The statement covers eight rights:

This resource tackles misconceptions around the decriminalisation of third parties. Drawing on the knowledge and lived experience of our member organisations around the world, our briefing challenges the simplistic and dangerous misrepresentation that it is possible to criminalise sex work, without harming sex workers.

This resource shows conclusively that where third parties are criminalised, sex workers suffer the consequences of that criminalisation.

You can download this 8 page PDF resource above. This resource is in English.

In this resource, UN Women respond to the anti-decriminalisation campaign by Equality Now. UN Women reaffirm that sex work is work, and that sex workers need the rights that come with full decriminalisation. They highlight and condemn attempts to conflate sex work with sexual exploitation and trafficking. They note that conflating these very different concepts leads to human rights abuses towards both sex workers and trafficked people.

APNSW's response to Equality now covers APNSW's support for the UN reports the recommend decriminalisation, and notes that Equality Now did not submit a response to the UN consultation.

The National Network of Sex Workers India responds to a new campaign to further criminalise sex workers. In their statement, they criticise the conflation of sex work with trafficking, and reiterate the NNSW-India's support of the UN's commitment to sex workers' rights.

The African Sex Worker Alliance statement in response to the attack on the UN recommendations regarding decriminalisation. ASWA state that they "stand firmly against the radical move by former sex workers and campaigners in the global north, to protest against the decriminalisation of sex workers ... [including] our partners, employees, and clients".

This detailed resource looks at the Canadian legal system and hierachy of laws from the perspective of launching a court case to prrotect the rights of sex workers. It discusses the Canadian law and your rights, the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, limits to the Charter, and how to challenge unconstitutional laws.

This concise, Canadian resource looks at why we need prostitution law reform, what the decriminalisation of sex work is, how decriminalisation happens, decriminalisation through the court system, and how to support sex workers in law reform. It notes, "decriminalisation alone cannot overcome all of the other injustices that many of us face, but it is a necessary step to protecting and respecting sex workers' rights".