Resources

NSWP collects documents and other materials about sex work and makes them publicly available on our website. The resources go back to 1992 and contain documents and photographs about the development of the sex worker rights movement, policy position papers from sex worker organisations around the world, academic papers about health, labour, legal frameworks, and migration, and NSWP briefing papers and publications, including Making Sex Work Safe and the NSWP peer-reviewed journal Research for Sex Work.

We focus on providing resources that support the core values of NSWP but we also include and critique some resources that do not promote our perspective.

Resources are organised by theme, region, year, language and resource type, so that they can be easily browsed. The search feature can be used to find resources on specific issues by entering in key words or authors’ names.

Note that resources that are available in French, Spanish, Chinese and Russian are on the language specific sections of this website.

NSWP is developing Research for Sex Work as a platform for building a broader collaboration with academia, initially through an email listserv to which members will be asked to nominate academics and community researchers.

Results 71 - 80 of 418

Results

The Chinese government is arbitrarily detaining sex workers through a flawed government policy purportedly aimed at education and rehabilitation, Asia Catalyst said in a new report released in December 2013.

The report documents excessive use of force by police in the detention of female sex workers, as well as the women's subsequent incarceration in the little-known "Custody and Education (C&E)" system.

This is the sixth issue of NSWP's quarterly newsletter ‘Sex Work Digest’. 

This resource is in English.  You can download this 9 page PDF above.

This workshop, from sex worker-led organisation Respect Inc, in Queensland, Australia, is a very thorough introduction to a wide range of issues relevant to sex workers - particularly those working in Queensland, Australia, due to this resources' discussion of the legal situation there, but also for sex workers more generally in terms of issues like safer sex, negotiating boundaries, emotional well-being, and safety tips.

This workshop, from sex worker-led organisation Respect Inc, in Queensland, Australia, is a very thorough introduction to a wide range of issues relevant to sex workers - particularly those working in Queensland, Australia, due to this resources' discussion of the legal situation there, but also for sex workers more generally in terms of issues like safer sex, negotiating boundaries, emotional well-being, and safety tips.

This workshop, from sex worker-led organisation Respect Inc, in Queensland, Australia, is a very thorough introduction to a wide range of issues relevant to sex workers - particularly those working in Queensland, Australia, due to this resources' discussion of the legal situation there, but also for sex workers more generally in terms of issues like safer sex, negotiating boundaries, emotional well-being, and safety tips.

This NSWP Statement responds to attempts to criminalise the purchase of sex in France. We condemn these proposals which are ideologically driven rather than evidence-based, and incorrectly view sex work through the prism of ‘violence against women’ whilst also irresponsibly conflating trafficking with sex work.

Following a global consultation with members, the NSWP Consensus Statement reaffirms NSWP ’s
global advocacy platform for sex work, human rights and the law. The Consensus Statement is issued on behalf of NSWP members and the sex workers they represent including sex workers of all genders, class, race, ethnicity, health status, age, nationality, citizenship, language, education levels, disabilities, and many other factors.

The statement covers eight rights:

Following a global consultation with members, the NSWP Consensus Statement reaffirms NSWP ’s
global advocacy platform for sex work, human rights and the law. The Consensus Statement is issued on behalf of NSWP members and the sex workers they represent including sex workers of all genders, class, race, ethnicity, health status, age, nationality, citizenship, language, education levels, disabilities, and many other factors.

The statement covers eight rights:

This resource tackles misconceptions around the decriminalisation of third parties. Drawing on the knowledge and lived experience of our member organisations around the world, our briefing challenges the simplistic and dangerous misrepresentation that it is possible to criminalise sex work, without harming sex workers.

This resource shows conclusively that where third parties are criminalised, sex workers suffer the consequences of that criminalisation.

You can download this 8 page PDF resource above. This resource is in English.

This resource builds on INCITE's substantial background in issues faced by wiomen of colour, criminalised or street-based communities, and queer and trans youth, particularly around police and state violence. It focuses on how "police violence against sex workers is not perceived by mainstream organisations as either police brutality, or violence against women, when it is clearly a manifestation of both".

You can download this 4 page PDF resource above. this resource is in English.