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REAL: Resources, Education, Advocacy for Local Sex Work (formerly STREET) in collaboration with Dr. Stacey Hannem have published a report entitled Let's Talk About Sex Work: Report of the REAL working group for Brantford, Haldimand, & Norfolk, Assessing the Needs of Sex Workers in Our Community. This report addresses the needs of rural-based sex workers in Ontario, Canada under Canada's anti-sex work legislation introduced in December 2014. They interviewed 30 sex workers and 12 social service and health service providers.

Download this resource: PDF icon Rural Sex Work Ontario, REAL - 2016.pdf
Theme: Human Rights

This is the 14th issue of NSWP's quarterly newsletter ‘Sex Work Digest’, covering the period October to December 2015. In addition to the important news stories during the quarter, this issue features a large number of new NSWP advocacy tools and other publications launched in the preceding 3 months.

Download this resource: PDF icon SW Digest Issue 14 Oct - Dec 2015.pdf

This is a Community Guide summarising the Mapping and Population Size Estimates of Sex Workers policy brief. It is an overview and critique of mapping, population size estimates and unique identifier codes and how they are used. The practices of mapping the places where sex workers live and work, and creating population size estimates, are becoming more routine. Some of the threats associated with these practices, and the strategies that are used to keep people safe and data confidential and secure, are discussed.

Theme: Human Rights

This policy brief is an overview and critique of mapping, population size estimates and unique identifier codes and how they are used. The practices of mapping the places where sex workers live and work, and creating population size estimates, are becoming more routine. Some of the threats associated with these practices, and the strategies that are used to keep people safe and data confidential and secure, are discussed. A Community Guide is also available.

Theme: Human Rights

These guidelines were developed by Stella, l’amie de Maimie for instances where Stella’s participation is sought in research projects. The document sets out some guiding principles both on the part of the researchers and Stella.

You can download this 2 page resource as a PDF above. This resource is in English.

Theme: Human Rights

This document sets out the standards that Wonetha expect researchers and other inquirers to maintain when carrying out research. Standards pertain to anonymity, reimbursement of costs incurred by sex workers and staff in taking part in research.

You can download this 1 page resource as a PDF above. This resource is in English.

Theme: Human Rights

Research into sex work is all too often perpetrated upon the sex worker community by outsiders who use individual sex workers as a bridge to gain access to participants. In recent times, sex workers have begun to demand appropriate payment from researchers who need our assistance and have critiqued research that is sloppy or morally biased.

Theme:

These guidelines titled, 'A note to researchers, students, reporters, and artists who are not sex workers' were devloped by Maggie’s Toronto–

This resource advises people outside of the sex worker community – who are interested in doing research on sex work – how to engage with sex workers.

You can download this 1 page guide as PDF above. This resource is in English.

Download this resource: PDF icon A-note-to-researchers_Maggies.pdf
Theme: Human Rights

This publication documents the lessons learned from the process of implementing a four-country research project on sex work and violence through the narratives and reflections of those who participated in the research since its inception in 2011. The publication was commissioned by the Centre for Advocacy on Stigma and Marginalization (CASAM) in consultation with APNSW, UNDP, UNFPA and P4P (Asia-Pacific regional offices in Bangkok). Funding for the travel to conduct interviews towards this documentation was provided by UNDP.

Download this resource: PDF icon THE RIGHTS PROCESS.pdf

This resource has been developed both for researchers and community-based organisations in rights-constrained environments. It is intended to help both researchers and community organisations to:

Download this resource: PDF icon MSMguidance2011.pdf
Theme: Health

This paper uses an example from Scarlet Alliance, Australian Sex Workers' Association and argues for more insider research on migrant sex work and trafficking. The paper is detailed and takes the reader through all the ethical considerations, processes and outcomes of a large scale multilingual migrant sex worker research project

Published as part of Research for Sex Work 13: HIV and Sex Work – The view from 2012.

You can download this 3 page PDF article above.  This article is in English & Chinese.

Theme: Health

After premature closures in 2004 of biomedical human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevention trials involving sex workers in Africa and Asia, the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) and Global Advocacy for HIV Prevention (AVAC) undertook consultations to establish better participatory guidelines for such trials in order to address ethical concerns. This study investigated sex workers’ knowledge and beliefs about research ethics and good participatory practices (GPP) and the perspectives of sex workers on research participation. A 33-question survey based on criteria identified by UNAIDS and AVAC was translated into three other languages.

Download this resource: PDF icon Ditmore-Allman Who is Helsinki.pdf

The Government is committed to enhancing the contribution of research to health and social care, and to the partnership between services and science. Research is essential to the successful promotion and protection of health and well-being and to modern and effective health and social care services. At the same time, research can involve an element of risk, both in terms of return on investment and sometimes for the safety and well-being of the research participants. Proper governance of research is therefore essential to ensure that the public can have confidence in, and benefit from, quality research in health and social care. The public has a right to expect high scientific, ethical and financial standards, transparent decision-making processes, clear allocation of responsibilities and robust monitoring arrangements.

Download this resource: PDF icon UKDH-RESEARCH.pdf

The consultation is to obtain views on ethics review of social care research. Comments are welcomed from those working in social care research and practice communities, from service users/carers or organisations representing them and from members of the public with an interest in research. The consultation follows the six criteria for consultation set out in Cabinet Office Code of Practice.

Download this resource: PDF icon UKDH-ETHICS.pdf

In response to the traditional emphasis on the rights, interests, and well-being of individual research subjects, there has been growing attention focused on the importance of involving communities in research development and approval.

Download this resource: PDF icon DICKERT-ETHICALGOALS.pdf

Research for Sex Work 7: Ethics in Healthcare and Research is a peer-reviewed publication for sex workers, activists, health workers, researchers, NGO staff and policy makers. It is available in English. All issues of Research for Sex Work can be found here.

Download this resource: PDF icon research-for-sex-work-7-english.pdf

This document describes the ethical and scientific requirements for their grantees and other studies requesting acknowledgement and funding that require the use of studies involving human beings. The document goes into detail in the following areas: Context of an ethics framework; Ethics Review; Free and informed consent; Privacy and confidentiality, Conflict of interest; Inclusion in research; Research involving Aboriginal peoples, Clinical Trials; Human Genetic Research; Research involving human gametes, embryos, or foetuses; and Human tissue research.

Download this resource: PDF icon TRICOUNCIL-ETHICS.pdf
Theme: Health

Some forms of research may create significant risks for research participants. In criminological and socio–legal research, it is typically the researcher who approaches a potential participant and asks for confidential information to be revealed in exchange for possibly not very much direct benefit. You can download this 26 page PDF resource above. This resource is in English.

Download this resource: PDF icon ISRAEL-CONFIDENTIAL.pdf
Theme: Health

First Nations need to protect all information concerning themselves, their traditional knowledge and culture, including information resulting from research. The principles of Ownership, Control, Access and Possession (OCAP) enable self-determination over all research concerning First Nations. It offers a way for First Nations to make decisions regarding what research will be done, for what purpose information or data will be used, where the information will be physically stored and who will have access.

Download this resource: PDF icon FNC-OCAP-001.pdf