treatment

Implications of the U.S. Supreme Court Ruling on the Anti-Prostitution Loyalty Oath

File 1168

On June 20, 2013, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in a 6-2 decision in Agency for International Development v. Alliance for Open Society International, Inc. that the Policy Requirement of the Anti-Prostitution Loyalty Oath, from the U.S. Leadership Act of 2003, violates the First Amendment, and is therefore unconstitutional.
 
A partial victory for the sex worker movement, it unfortunately makes no stated distinction between sex work and human trafficking, and it is not a defence of sex worker rights. However, this ruling may decrease stigma around sex work, by allowing organisations in the United States that receive PEPFAR funding to publically adopt a neutral stance towards sex work, and focus on implementing best practices for public health aims. 

World Health Organisation recommendations on Prevention & Treatment of HIV/STIs for Sex Workers in low and middle income countries

Год: 
2012

NSWP welcomes the launch today of the ‘Prevention and Treatment of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections for sex workers in low- and middle-income countries: Recommendations for a public health approach’. The guidance was developed jointly with WHO,UNFPA, UNAIDS and NSWP who conducted the qualitative survey of sex worker values and preferences relating to the interventions being considered.

The report is designed for use by national public health officials and managers of HIV/AIDS and STI programmes, NGOs and health workers, but will also be of interest to international funding agencies, health policy-makers and advocates. It  combines good practice recommendations derived from ethics and human rights principles, with technical evidence-based recommendations supported by scientific evidence AND the lived experiences of sex workers across the globe.

NSWP particularly welcomes the recommendations that governments should work towards the decriminalisation of sex work and elimination of the unjust application of non-criminal laws and regulations against sex workers which exacerbate sex workers vulnerability to HIV and STIs. In addition we welcome the recommendation that HIV prevention and treatment programmes need to include interventions to enhance community empowerment among sex workers that is sex worker-led and we particularly welcome the recommendation set out in the document that redefines the ethical use of periodic presumptive treatment (PPT) for sex workers.  It emphasises that PPT should only be used as an emergency short term measure under the strictest of conditions and while comprehensive sexual health services are being developed and that PPT must only be offered if its uptake is voluntary, not imposed as part of a coercive or mandatory public health regime.

NSWP welcomes new WHO recommendations on Prevention & Treatment of HIV/STIs for Sex Workers

NSWP welcomes the launch today of the ‘Prevention and Treatment of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections for sex workers in low- and middle-income countries: Recommendations for a public health approach’. The guidance was developed jointly with WHO,UNFPA, UNAIDS and NSWP who conducted the qualitative survey of sex worker values and preferences relating to the interventions being considered.

The report is designed for use by national public health officials and managers of HIV/AIDS and STI programmes, NGOs and health workers, but will also be of interest to international funding agencies, health policy-makers and advocates. It  combines good practice recommendations derived from ethics and human rights principles, with technical evidence-based recommendations supported by scientific evidence AND the lived experiences of sex workers across the globe.

NSWP particularly welcomes the recommendations that governments should work towards the decriminalisation of sex work and elimination of the unjust application of non-criminal laws and regulations against sex workers which exacerbate sex workers vulnerability to HIV and STIs. In addition we welcome the recommendation that HIV prevention and treatment programmes need to include interventions to enhance community empowerment among sex workers that is sex worker-led and we particularly welcome the recommendation set out in the document that redefines the ethical use of periodic presumptive treatment (PPT) for sex workers.  It emphasises that PPT should only be used as an emergency short term measure under the strictest of conditions and while comprehensive sexual health services are being developed and that PPT must only be offered if its uptake is voluntary, not imposed as part of a coercive or mandatory public health regime. 

Good practice recommendations include:

  • All countries should work toward decriminalisation of sex work and elimination of the unjust application of non-criminal laws and regulations against sex workers
  • Governments should establish antidiscrimination and other rights respecting laws to protect against discrimination and violence, and other violations of rights faced by sex workers in order to realise their human rights and reduce their vulnerability to HIV infection
  • Health services should be made available, accessible and acceptable to sex workers based on the principles of avoidance of stigma, non-discrimination and the right to health
  • Violence against sex workers is a risk factor for HIV and must be prevented and addressed in partnership with sex workers and sex worker led organisations.

Technical recommendations include:

  • A package of interventions to enhance community empowerment among sex workers
  • Correct and consistent condom use among sex workers and their clients
  • Offering periodic screening for asymptomatic STIs to female sex workers
  • Offering female sex workers, in settings with high prevalence and limited clinical services, periodic presumptive treatment for asymptomatic STIs
  • Offering voluntary HIV testing and counselling to sex workers
  • Using the current WHO recommendations on the use of antiretroviral therapy for HIV-positive general populations for sex workers
  • Using the current WHO recommendations on harm reduction for sex workers who inject drugs
  • Including sex workers as targets of catch-up HBV immunisation strategies in settings where infant immunisation has not reached full coverage

These recommendations mark a significant advance in evidence-based guidelines for designing and implementing effective HIV and STI prevention and treatment interventions for sex workers.

You can download these recommendations (52 page PDF) in English below. 

You can read WHO's policy brief on these recommendations on their website here.

FDA panel backs Truvada as PrEP

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) Antiviral Drugs Advisory Committee, has recommended Truvada for approval for prescription as HIV prevention for those most at risk of infection.  

Sign this Petition to safeguard affordable medicines

Novarstis, a multi-billion dollar Swiss pharma company may get the Indian Supreme Court to shut down the supply of affordable medicines. Novartis is suing the Indian government, if Novartis wins, it will threaten Indian companies’ ability to produce low-cost medicines for malaria, AIDS, cancer and other life-threatening diseases, depriving millions around the world of the treatments they desperately need and threatening thousands of Indian jobs. 

Sign the petition against this action on the AVAAZ website.

Report on the Impact of China's 2010 "Strike Hard Campaign": A Crackdown on Sex Work

Source: AsiaCatalyst.org
 
The 2010 "Strike Hard Campaign" (police crackdowns) put in place a zero tolerance policy on sex work, gambling and drugs all across China. While many brothels and popular clubs were closed ultimately sex workers continued work out in more remote areas. This geographic shift cut people off from essential health services, HIV/AIDS education, and even funeral services for women who die while cut off from their families.

Here in its first major report The China Sex Worker Organization Network Forum trained its members to document the effects of the crackdown.

NSWP - WHO Community Consultation Report - updated

Download this resource: 
Год: 
2012

This document has been updated following discussions at the consensus meeting on the need to highlight explicitly the responses provided on collective empowerment. 

The Global Network of Sex Work Projects (NSWP) oversaw a civil society consultation of sex workers commissioned by the WHO to gather feedback on their proposed guidelines for evidence-based interventions for the prevention and treatment of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in low- and middle-income countries.

NSWP - WHO Community Consultation Report - updated

This document has been updated following discussions at the consensus meeting on the need to highlight explicitly the responses provided on collective empowerment. 

The World Health Organization (WHO) is developing guidelines for evidence-based interventions
for the prevention and treatment of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in low- and
middle-income countries.

The Global Network of Sex Work Projects (NSWP) oversaw a civil society consultation of sex workers commissioned by the WHO to gather feedback on the proposed guidelines and produced this report, entitled:

'Female, Male and Transgender Sex Workers' Perspectives on HIV & STI Prevention and Treatment Services: a global sex worker consultation.'

Download this resource: 

NSWP - WHO Community Consultation Report - archived

Год: 
2012

The Global Network of Sex Work Projects (NSWP) oversaw a civil society consultation of sex workers commissioned by the WHO to gather feedback on their proposed guidelines for evidence-based interventions for the prevention and treatment of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in low- and middle-income countries.

NSWP - WHO Community Consultation Report - archived

The World Health Organization (WHO) is developing guidelines for evidence-based interventions
for the prevention and treatment of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in low- and
middle-income countries.

The Global Network of Sex Work Projects (NSWP) oversaw a civil society consultation of sex workers commissioned by the WHO to gather feedback on the proposed guidelines and produced this report, entitled:

'Female, Male and Transgender Sex Workers' Perspectives on HIV & STI Prevention and Treatment Services: a global sex worker consultation.'