Dónde trabajan nuestros miembros

Los miembros de la NSWP son organizaciones y redes locales, nacionales o regionales, de personas que ejercen trabajo sexual ubicadas en cinco regiones: África, Asia y el Pacífico, Europa, América Latina y Norteamérica y el Caribe. Los miembros  en cada región eligen dos representantes a la Junta de Directores de la NSWP.

Es requisito para todas las organizaciones miembros suscribir los valores fundamentales de la NSWP así como la Declaración de Consenso sobre Trabajo Sexual, Derechos Humanos y la Ley. Sólo las organizaciones y redes lideradas por PERTS tienen derecho a voto.

Los miembros de la NSWP provienen de diversas culturas y tienen diferentes experiencias e historias organizacionales. La mayoría son organizaciones independientes lideradas por PERTS, algunas son grupos informales de PERTS dentro de organizaciones más grandes, y algunas son ONGs que promueven los derechos de las PERTS. Algunas organizaciones miembros proveen servicios, otras se enfocan en abogacía, otras más en movilizarse para reducir la vulnerabilidad; todas trabajan temáticas de derechos humanos que repercuten en la salud y el bienestar de las PERTS.

Usted puede encontrar a nuestros miembros buscando en las páginas regionales o haciendo click en los paraguas rojos sobre el mapa.

Nota: Por razones de seguridad como de protección, la NSWP no identifica qué miembros son organizaciones lideradas por PERTS en nuestro sitio web, y algunos de nuestros miembros pueden haber escogido no aparecer públicamente en él.

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Regional updates

24th Septiembre 2010 by NSWP | Region: Global

This paper tries to give an impetus to further explore the meaning of a human rights based approach in the field of trafficking.

24th Septiembre 2010 by NSWP | Region: Global

The Annotated Guide to the new UN Trafficking Protocol is a tool to assist advocates in the development of a human rights framework for national anti-trafficking laws and policies. In December 2000, the UN adopted international instruments to fight transnational organized crime and additional agreements or protocols to combat trafficking in persons, smuggling and firearms.

24th Septiembre 2010 by NSWP | Region: Global

Recommended Principles and Guidelines on Human Rights
and Human Trafficking
Report of the United Nations High Commissioner for
Human Rights to the Economic and Social Council.

You can download this 16 page PDF resource above. This resource is in English.

24th Septiembre 2010 by NSWP | Region: Europe

This article examines the public discourses invoked in United Kingdom debates about prostitution and the trafficking of women. It takes two particular debates as its focus: the kerbcrawling debates from the late 1970s to the present and the more recent trafficking debate. The authors suggest that there are three striking features about the UK discourses on prostitution: i) the absence of the sex work discourse, ii) the dominance of the public nuisance discourse in relation to kerb-crawling, and iii) the dominance of a traditional moral discourse in relation to trafficking.

24th Septiembre 2010 by NSWP | Region: Global

Report of the Special Rapporteur on violence against women, its causes and consequences, Ms. Radhika Coomaraswamy, on trafficking in women, women's migration and violence against women, submitted in accordance with Commission on Human Rights resolution 1997/44.

You can download this 38 page PDF resource above. This resource is in English.

24th Septiembre 2010 by NSWP | Region: North America and the Caribbean

In this article, the author makes the case that the state's proposals for addressing trafficking enable the state to posit itself as responsible for protecting "Canadians" while carefully avoiding any responsibility for the well-being of women who are trafficked; demonize smugglers as the cause of trafficking; and override the concerns and interests of women who are trafficked by making deportation the only "solution" to their presence in Canada.

24th Septiembre 2010 by NSWP | Region: Europe

This article examines national news reports on prostitution of Russian women in northern Norway between 1990 and 2001. Applying critical discourse analysis, the author shows how this particular type of cross-border, rural prostitution is represented as sexual transaction, as a sociopolitical problem (of public order, public health, social/moral breakdown and stigma), and as a symbolic issue used to legitimize stricter border controls. Images of prostitutes, pimps and customers are also discussed.

24th Septiembre 2010 by NSWP | Region: Global

One might think that there would be no objections to reaching out to help trafficked persons. However, as this interview with Jo Doezema of the Network of Sex Work Projects reveals, even well-intended efforts to help one group can sometimes cause harm to another group. In this case, attempts to rescue trafficked girls from brothels can trample on the rights of voluntary sex workers. In addition, some groups inappropriately label all sex workers as trafficked persons, believing mistakenly that no one would willingly enter or stay in this occupation.

24th Septiembre 2010 by NSWP | Region: North America and the Caribbean

This document describes the ethical and scientific requirements for their grantees and other studies requesting acknowledgement and funding that require the use of studies involving human beings. The document goes into detail in the following areas: Context of an ethics framework; Ethics Review; Free and informed consent; Privacy and confidentiality, Conflict of interest; Inclusion in research; Research involving Aboriginal peoples, Clinical Trials; Human Genetic Research; Research involving human gametes, embryos, or foetuses; and Human tissue research.

24th Septiembre 2010 by NSWP | Region: North America and the Caribbean

This article details the passage and possible use of the Trafficking Victims Protection Act (TVPA), passed in the fall of 2000 in the United States of America. Unlike previous legislation, which tended to focus exclusively on the sex industry, the Act’s definition of trafficking has a wider scope, and also includes workers in sweatshops and other types of Employment. You can download this 42 page PDF resource above. This resource is in English