Where our members work

NSWP’s members are local, national and regional sex worker organisations and networks, across five regions: Africa; Asia and the Pacific; Europe (including Eastern Europe and Central Asia); Latin America and North America and the Caribbean. Members in each region elect two representatives to the NSWP Board of Directors.

All member organisations are required to endorse NSWP’s core values and the Consensus Statement on Sex Work, Human Rights, and the Law. Only sex worker-led organisations and networks have voting rights.

NSWP members are from diverse cultures and have different experiences and organisational histories. Most are independent sex worker-led organisations, some are informal groups of sex workers within larger organisations and some are non-governmental organisations who support sex workers rights. Some member organisations provide services, some focus on advocacy, some on mobilising to reduce vulnerability – all work on human rights issues that affect the health and well-being of sex workers.

You can find our members through the regional pages or by clicking on the red umbrellas on the map.

Note: For both safety and security NSWP does not identify which members are sex worker-led on our website, and members can choose not to be listed on the public website.


 

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Regional updates

24th September 2010 by NSWP | Region: Global

Prostitutes of New York is an organisation of many kinds of workers in New York City’s
sex industry. PONY is a member of the international Network of Sex Work Projects,
which advocates for the rights of sex workers around the world. We are concerned about
two keywords that have arisen in anti-sex work anti-trafficking advocacy: “demand” and
“dignity.” This statement addresses use of the term “Dignity.”

24th September 2010 by NSWP | Region: Global

“Demand” is a current buzzword among some anti-trafficking activists, in which they argue that demand for sex work drives trafficking in persons, and that arresting clients who patronize sex workers will reduce the problem. However, demand for sex work is not a predominant driving factor for trafficking, which is driven by poverty, race, and gender inequities.

You can download this 1 page PDF resource above. This resource is in English.

24th September 2010 by NSWP | Region: Latin America

En el movimiento social para construir un discurso de ‘violencia contra las mujeres’ y sensibilizar a la sociedad sobre algunos tipos de maltrato que antes no eran reconocidos, se ha llegado a un momento en que el objetivo se centra en definir crímenes y aplicar castigos. Mientras sí constituye un progreso concientizar sobre la violencia y la explotación para intentar impedir que se cometan delitos, espero mostrar que el énfasis actual en la disciplina está lejos de una visión utópica y que existe la posibilidad de abordar soluciones más humanas.

24th September 2010 by NSWP | Region: Asia and the Pacific

Letter to Mr Owen Walsh.

You can download this 3 page PDF resource above. This resource is in English.

24th September 2010 by NSWP | Region: Asia and the Pacific

You can download this 18 page PDF resource above. This resource is in English.

24th September 2010 by NSWP | Region: Europe

You can download this 14 page PDF resource above. This resource is in English.

24th September 2010 by NSWP | Region: Europe

You can download this 20 page PDF resource above. This resource is in English.

24th September 2010 by NSWP | Region: Global

Vous pouvez télécharger ce ressource de 10 pages PDF ci-dessus. Cette ressource est en français

24th September 2010 by NSWP | Region: Global

You can download this 9 page PDF resource above. This resource is in English.

24th September 2010 by NSWP | Region: Global

The subject of The Politics of Prostitution is not really prostitution politics. Instead, the research collected here seeks to answer the questions ‘Do women’s policy agencies matter?’ and ‘Is there such a thing as state feminism?’ The Research Network on Gender Politics and the State (RNGS) has been studying these questions since 1995 in ‘Western political democracies’; prostitution is only one of five issues which members have used to measure the impact of women’s movements for equality. By the term ‘women’s movements’, the researchers mean a range of organisations and groups, both grassroots and formal, which may or may not self-identify as feminist. By ‘women’s policy agencies’, they refer to government institutions which exist to advance women’s status in society. These definitions are key to appreciating the book.