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‘The XXX Forum’ entitled “Celebrating a Decade of Action, Designing Our Future,” was a first of its kind in Quebec. It was a historical moment, a time for dialogue and for sharing our thoughts on how to support sex workers all over the world. This meeting allowed us to consolidate a system for community support by and for sex workers, and to attack the stigma that affects people who do sex work.

Download this resource: PDF icon Stella_RapFor_Ang_small.pdf

This resource is a handout produced by an NSWP member.

It includes five smart and simple tips for maintaining healthy personal boundaries while working in the sex industry.

You can download this 1 page document above. This resource is in English. 

This report was commissioned and funded by the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) and implemented by the Sex Work Education and Advocacy Taskforce (SWEAT). The report found that during the 2010 World Cup period, there was a small increase in the number of female sex workers who advertised online and in newspapers and sex workers did not typically see more clients during the World Cup period. The report also found that sex workers' demographics did not change significantly during the World Cup. The date does not support fears about an increase of children or foreign migrant sex workers into the sex industry during the World Cup.

Download this resource: PDF icon SWEAT report - low res (2).pdf

National Day of Action against India's Immoral Trafficking Prevention Amendment

Bangalore

July 1, 2008

The Karnataka State Coalition Against ITPA (Constituent Organizations: Aneka, Ashodaya Samithi, Jyothi Mahila Sangha, Karnataka Sexual Minorities Forum, Karnataka Sexworkers Union, LesBiT, Samara, Sangama, Sangram, Suraksha, Swathi Mahila Sangha, Veshya Anyay Mukthi Parishad, Vijaya Mahila Sangha) urges the government of India to:

The Bangkok Call for Justice for Women Migrant Workers

Partners in Change, Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women (GAATW) November 6-8, 2002, Bangkok

The Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women (GAATW) along with several of its network members recent held a 3-day event on 6-8 November, 2002 in Bangkok. This event, Partners in Change, brought together a number of people from across Asia who have been working from their specific locations to articulate and affirm the human rights framework. This was a unique gathering in that many of our participants belong to the so called 'marginalised groups' — trafficked women, domestic workers and sex workers. However, all of them have rejected 'permanent victimhood', organised themselves, questioned the attitude of mainstream society and policy makers towards them, and claimed their rights as human beings. Partners in Change celebrated and analysed those courageous efforts, and discussed future collaborative strategies.

For more information on Prostitution Issues at the World Conference on Women Beijing '95 see the Prostitutes Education Network at: http://www.bayswan.org/UNpage.html.

Trafficking Statement from the North American Delegates of the Network of Sex Work Projects

Recognizing that fraudulent and coercive trafficking and forced prostitution have historically been problems, threatening the health and well-being of women in developing countries, as well as women in post-industrialized countries, and

The RighT Guide is a tool to assess the human rights impacts of anti-trafficking policies. The tool was created by both sex worker-led organisations and allies. The aim of the toolkit is to provide NGOs and other organisations with a tool they can use to assess the consequences of anti-trafficking policies on the human rights of the people most affect by these policies, such as sex workers. The tool provides the step-by-step process to study the impact of anti-trafficking policies, which then provides evidence-based research for advocacy against these policies.

Download this resource: PDF icon 10 The RighT guide_ENG.pdf

This document includes 15 factsheets that answer questions and define terms used in the RighT Guide: A Tool to Assess the Human Rights Impact of Anti-trafficking Policies. The tool was created by both sex worker-led organisations and allies. The aim of the toolkit is to provide NGOs and other organisations with a tool they can use to assess the consequences of anti-trafficking policies on the human rights of the people most affect by these policies, such as sex workers. These factsheets should be used with the RighT Guide to answer questions that readers may have.

Download this resource: PDF icon 10 The RighT guide_Factsheets_ENG.pdf

The meeting was organised by Different Avenues, Women of Colour United and Center for Health and Gender Equity (CHANGE), and was held at OSI in Washington, D.C. OSI commissioned the analysis of U.S. immigration law and review of the grounds for inadmissibility to inform conversations about a waiver process for sex workers, people who use drugs and those with criminal convictions to attend the 2012 AIDS conference that is planned to be held in the U.S..

Download this resource: PDF icon Travel Bans Mtg Notes Sept 20.pdf

This paper tries to give an impetus to further explore the meaning of a human rights based approach in the field of trafficking.

Download this resource: PDF icon WIJERS-EXPLORATION.pdf

One might think that there would be no objections to reaching out to help trafficked persons. However, as this interview with Jo Doezema of the Network of Sex Work Projects reveals, even well-intended efforts to help one group can sometimes cause harm to another group. In this case, attempts to rescue trafficked girls from brothels can trample on the rights of voluntary sex workers. In addition, some groups inappropriately label all sex workers as trafficked persons, believing mistakenly that no one would willingly enter or stay in this occupation.

Download this resource: PDF icon RHR-DOEZEMA.pdf

“Demand” is a current buzzword among some anti-trafficking activists, in which they argue that demand for sex work drives trafficking in persons, and that arresting clients who patronize sex workers will reduce the problem. However, demand for sex work is not a predominant driving factor for trafficking, which is driven by poverty, race, and gender inequities.

You can download this 1 page PDF resource above. This resource is in English.

Download this resource: PDF icon BEIJING-DEMAND.pdf

This resource looks at Raymond's 'ten reasons' and discusses why each reason is poorly thought out, or missing crucial information.

You can download this seven page PDF resource above.

This resource is in English.