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This report and executive summary by the Global Commission on HIV and Law, supported by UNDP, examines the role of law in effective HIV responses. The report is based on expert submissions, research on HIV, health and law, and testimony of 700 people most affected by HIV-related laws from 140 countries.

Theme: Health

Prior to the 2010 International AIDS Conference, the Smart Person's Guide to HIV and Sex Work was released in order to clarify current policy and action items relating to HIV and the role of sex worker organisations in responding to this global epidemic.

Download this resource: PDF icon Smart Guide to HIV and Sex Work.pdf
Theme: Health

This research is the first large scale quantitative research on sex workers in Fiji. It has enabled an understanding of the nature and extent of sex work in Fiji, rates of HIV and STI infection among sex workers and their knowledge and behaviour around safer sex practices. This research will compliment valuable insights gained from previous qualitative research. The findings from this research will assist in the appropriate targeting and provision of education, resources and health care services to a group previously defined by UNAIDS as a most-at-risk population.

Download this resource: PDF icon IBBS Sex Worker Final Report.pdf

This reference text seeks to "clarify terms and illustrate examples of alternatives to the use of criminal law as a response to sex work". It provides capsule definitions - with small case-studies or examples - of what a variety of laws and policies look like in terms of their impact on sex work, covering criminalisation, legalisation, and decriminalisation, along with a mini-discussion of other laws that are used against sex workers, such as the criminalisation of HIV transmission, or immigration enforcement.

Download this resource: PDF icon sex-work-laws-policies-20120713[1].pdf

'Criminalising Condoms' details the experiences of sex workers and outreach services across six countries (Kenya, Namibia, Russia, Zimbabwe, South Africa and the United States). It finds that where any degree of criminalisation exists (whether of sex workers themselves, or of activities relating to sex work), condoms are used as evidence of sex work. This forces sex workers to choose between carrying safer sex supplies, thus attracting the deleterious attentions of the police, or working without condoms in the hope that the police will refrain from harassment - but also without the supplies that would protect them from HIV.

Download this resource: PDF icon criminalizing-condoms-20120717[1].pdf

This 10th Missing the Target report (MTT10) focuses on challenges to the scale-up of HIV services as required to implement the Treatment 2.0 framework. That framework refers to an initiative developed and proposed in June 2010 by the World Health Organization (WHO) and Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) that aims to “catalyse the next phase of HIV treatment scale-up through promoting innovation and efficiency gains.”

Theme: Health

Published as part of Research for Sex Work 13: HIV and Sex Work – The view from 2012.

You can download this 2 page PDF article above.  This article is in English & Chinese.

Theme: Health

Published as part of Research for Sex Work 13: HIV and Sex Work – The view from 2012.

You can download this 2 page PDF article above.  This article is in English & Chinese.

Theme: Health

Published as part of Research for Sex Work 13: HIV and Sex Work – The view from 2012.

You can download this 2 page PDF article above.  This article is in English & Chinese.

Download this resource: PDF icon R4SW 13 - No Condoms as Evidence.pdf
Theme: Health

Published as part of Research for Sex Work 13: HIV and Sex Work – The view from 2012.

You can download this 2 page PDF article above.  This article is in English & Chinese.

Theme: Health

Published as part of Research for Sex Work 13: HIV and Sex Work – The view from 2012.

You can download this 2 page PDF article above.  This article is in English & Chinese.

Theme: Health

Published as part of Research for Sex Work 13: HIV and Sex Work – The view from 2012.

You can download this 3 page PDF article above.  This article is in English & Chinese.

Theme: Health

Published as part of Research for Sex Work 13: HIV and Sex Work – The view from 2012.

You can download this 2 page PDF article above.  This article is in English & Chinese.

Theme: Health

Published as part of Research for Sex Work 13: HIV and Sex Work – The view from 2012.

You can download this 3 page PDF article above.  This article is in English & Chinese.

Theme: Health

Published as part of Research for Sex Work 13: HIV and Sex Work – The view from 2012.

You can download this 3 page PDF article above.  This article is in English & Chinese.

Theme: Health

Published as part of Research for Sex Work 13: HIV and Sex Work – The view from 2012.

You can download this 3 page PDF article above.  This article is in English & Chinese.

Theme: Health

Published as part of Research for Sex Work 13: HIV and Sex Work – The view from 2012.

You can download this 2 page PDF article above.  This article is in English & Chinese.

Download this resource: PDF icon R4SW 13 - Living with HIV.pdf
Theme: Health

Published as part of Research for Sex Work 13: HIV and Sex Work – The view from 2012.

You can download this 3 page PDF article above.  This article is in English & Chinese.

Theme: Health

Research for Sex Work 13: HIV and Sex Work is a peer-reviewed publication for sex workers, activists, health workers, researchers, NGO staff and policy makers. It is available in English and Chinese. All issues of Research for Sex Work can be found here.

Download this resource: PDF icon R4SW Issue 13 Dec 2012-c.pdf
Theme: Health

NSWP welcomes the launch today of the ‘Prevention and Treatment of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections for sex workers in low- and middle-income countries: Recommendations for a public health approach’. The guidance was developed jointly with WHO,UNFPA, UNAIDS and NSWP who conducted the qualitative survey of sex worker values and preferences relating to the interventions being considered.

The report is designed for use by national public health officials and managers of HIV/AIDS and STI programmes, NGOs and health workers, but will also be of interest to international funding agencies, health policy-makers and advocates. It  combines good practice recommendations derived from ethics and human rights principles, with technical evidence-based recommendations supported by scientific evidence AND the lived experiences of sex workers across the globe.

NSWP particularly welcomes the recommendations that governments should work towards the decriminalisation of sex work and elimination of the unjust application of non-criminal laws and regulations against sex workers which exacerbate sex workers vulnerability to HIV and STIs. In addition we welcome the recommendation that HIV prevention and treatment programmes need to include interventions to enhance community empowerment among sex workers that is sex worker-led and we particularly welcome the recommendation set out in the document that redefines the ethical use of periodic presumptive treatment (PPT) for sex workers.  It emphasises that PPT should only be used as an emergency short term measure under the strictest of conditions and while comprehensive sexual health services are being developed and that PPT must only be offered if its uptake is voluntary, not imposed as part of a coercive or mandatory public health regime.

Theme: Health