миграция и торговля людьми

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Amnesty Cautions Against the Criminalisation of Clients Clause in Northern Irish Trafficking Bill

The Human Trafficking and Exploitation Bill proposed by Lord Morrow currently being considered in Northern Ireland could, if passed into law, usefully place support for victims of human trafficking on a statutory basis and amalgamate some existing legislation into one single Act. The Bill includes a clause that recommends the criminalisation of the purchase of sex to reduce demand for trafficking.

La Strada International's statement for International Women’s Day 2014

La Strada International statement for International Women’s Day 2014, “Equality for women is progress for all”

On 8 March 2014, International Women’s Day, La Strada international, the European network against trafficking in human beings, calls for full empowerment and integration of women in all levels of economic, social and cultural activities.

New Resource on Insider Led Migrant Sex Work Research

A new resource has been uploaded on our website. The paper uses an example from Scarlet Alliance, Australian Sex Workers' Association and argues for more insider research on migrant sex work and trafficking. The paper is detailed and takes the reader through all the ethical considerations, processes and outcomes of a large scale multilingual migrant sex worker research project

12 anti-trafficking NGOs criticise Mary Honeyball report

La Strada International (LSI), the European NGO Network against Trafficking in Human Beings, and its partners in the LSI NGO platform – who are united against trafficking in human beings, have issued a statement strongly opposing the report by the FEMM committee that was drafted by Mary Honeyball. The report on ‘sexual exploitation and prostitution and its impact on gender equality’ calls for the so-called ‘Swedish Model’.

Collateral Damage: The Impact of Anti-Trafficking Measures on Human Rights around the World

The Global Alliance Against the Trafficking in Women's anthology 'Collateral Damage' reviews the experience of eight specific countries (Australia, Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH), Brazil, India, Nigeria, Thailand, the United Kingdom, and the United States). The report attempts to assess what the impact  of anti-trafficking measures have been for a variety of people living and working there, or migrating into or out of these

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Comments on the USA Trafficking In Persons Report 2013

Although migrant sex workers in Thailand are grateful for the concern showed for their well-being they would like to ask people read their report “Hit & Run” rather than the TIP report on Thailand which is again disappointing in so many ways. In brief, the TIP report is very poorly written; there is a complete lack of accountability; it is full of sweeping assumptions and generalizations; conclusions are based on guesswork rather than evidence e.g. “sex tourism may fuel human trafficking - presumably then there is an equal chance that it may not? The chronic problem they have with accurate and credible numbers persists e.g. according to the first TIP report 2001 there were 700,000 people trafficked globally but now the same report claims 27 million people are trafficked. . It is not credible academically and not accessible to migrant communities.  The report adds no new or useful information to the previous reports.

Rescuing Trafficking from Ideological Capture: Prostitution Reform and Anti-Trafficking Law and Policy

This article offers a historical account and critical assessment of the prostitution-reform debates’ considerable influence on anti-trafficking law and policy development over the last decade. The article exposes the difficulties of translating anti-prostitution ideology, borne out of closely held moral and ethical beliefs, into effective governance strategies.

Human Trafficking and Sex Work

This concise guide to the difference between sex work and trafficking - and what a response to trafficking grounded in sex worker rights looks like - discusses the key differences between sex work and trafficking; the differences that make the habitual conflation of the two not only inaccurate but also a hinderance to tackling actual exploitation, and a threat to the human rights of sex workers.

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