миграция и торговля людьми

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Summary: Sex Work is Not Trafficking

This is a summary of the Sex Work is Not Trafficking briefing paper. It explains how sex work is conflated with trafficking; the legal framework; how demand for sex work is conflated with trafficking; the dangers of conflating trafficking with sex work, its impacts on sex workers’ lives and work; the impact on sex worker programming; and offers some recommendations for policy makers, donors and for civil society. 

Sex Work is Not Trafficking

This briefing paper explains how sex work is conflated with trafficking; the legal framework; how demand for sex work is conflated with trafficking; the dangers of conflating trafficking with sex work, its impacts on sex workers’ lives and work; the impact on sex worker programming; and offers some recommendations for policy makers, donors and for civil society. A summary is also available.

The Report of the UNAIDS Advisory Group on HIV and Sex Work

This report has been withdrawn, following agreement with UNAIDS in February 2012 to revisions in the document. It will be made available again once the revisions have been done and the final document is uploaded onto the UNAIDS website.  

This resource was officially launched this week at the UNAIDS Secretariat in Geneva, during the 29th meeting of the UNAIDS Programme Coordinating Board. 

Intended to accompany the UNAIDS Guidance Note on HIV and Sex Work (2009) this important resource was developed by the UNAIDS Advisory Group on HIV and Sex Work.  

What's the Cost of a Rumour?

In this guide, GAATW review the literature from past sporting events, and find that they do not cause increases in trafficking for prostitution. The guide takes a closer look at why this unsubstantiated idea still captures the imagination of politicians and some media, and offers stakeholders a more constructive approach to address trafficking beyond short-term events. This guide will help stakeholders quickly correct misinformation about trafficking, develop evidence-based anti-trafficking responses, and learn what worked and what did not in past host cities. 

Download this resource: 

New Reasearch de-bunks Trafficking at Sports Events Myth

A new publication from the Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women (GAATW): What's the Cost of a Rumour? 

A guide to sorting out the myths and the facts about sporting events and trafficking

There has been a lot published on the supposed link between sporting events and trafficking, but how much of it is true and how much of it is useful?  

Study finds 'most London sex workers not trafficked or forced'

Research launched at a recent London seminar, as reported on PLRI's website, showed that:

  • Many migrants prefer working in the sex industry rather than the "unrewarding and sometimes exploitative conditions they meet in non-sexual jobs".
  • Many migrants working in the sex industry send money back to their country of origin, thereby "dramatically improving the living conditions of their families".
  • Police efforts to combat organised crime is undermined by the fact that victims of exploitation cannot be guaranteed indefinite leave to remain in the UK.
  •  The research findings presented were from the ESRC-funded ‘Migrant Workers in the UK Sex Industry’, led by Dr Nick Mai from the Institute for the Study of European Transformations at London Metropolitan University. 

You can read the full research report here.

Myths About Human Trafficking

Ronald Weitzer, Professor of Sociology at George Washington University, writes an insightful article in 'The Huffington Post'  exposing some of the enduring myths about human trafficking and the dangers of conflating sex trafficking with sex work itself.  Read the whole article here.

Ain't I a Woman? A Global Dialogue Between the Sex Workers’ Rights Movement and the Stop Violence Against Women Movement

This report documents a meeting entitled "Ain't I A Woman? A Global Dialogue between the Sex Workers Rights Movement and the Stop Violence against Women Movement" from 12-14 March 2009 in Bangkok, Thailand. The report features the presentations from many  speakers in the sex workers' rights movement including Cheryl Overs, Meena Seshu, Ruth Morgan Thomas, Anna-Louise Crago, Kaythi Win, Hua Sittipham Boonyapisomparn, Swapna Gayen and Meenakshi Kamble.

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Will the Gate Foundation Please Stop Funding the Kidnapping and Illegal Detention of Sex Workers?

The Asia Pacific Network of Sex Workers wrote this letter against the funding of International Justice Mission (IJM) for a pilot project to 'rescue' sex workers in Asia. The project coordinates with local police during brothel raids where sex workers are forcibly removed and detained illegally. The Global Network of Sex Work Projects condemns these violations of sex workers' rights, and has demanded that the Gates Foundation immediately cease funding these human rights abuses by the International Justice Mission.