Human Rights

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УЧАСТИЕ НСВП В 63-ЕЙ СЕССИИ КОМИССИИ ПО ПОЛОЖЕНИЮ ЖЕНЩИН

НСВП составила делегацию из представителей членских организаций для участия в 63-ей сессии Комиссии по положению женщин (КПЖ). Мы поставили перед собой задачу высказать точку зрения защитников прав секс-работников в среде, где главенствующую роль в обсуждениях секс-работы играют феминистские и аболиционистские группы, которые не в состоянии представить разнообразие жизненного опыта секс-работников. В этих условиях смешение торговли людьми и секс-работы способствует продвижению политики, которая вредит соблюдению прав секс-работников.

NSWP参加第63届妇女地位委员会会议

NSWP协助成员组织成立了一个代表团参加第63届妇女地位委员会(CSW63)。原教旨女权主义者和废娼主义者一直主导着性工作问题的讨论,这个代表团旨在扩大性工作者权利倡导者的声音,反映性工作者生活经历和现实的多样性,避免贩运和性工作的混淆被用来促进损害性工作者权利的政策。妇女地位委员会(CSW)是联合国内的重要空间,应当促进尊重、保护和实现包括性工作者在内的所有妇女的人权。

第63届CSW关于社会保护和公共服务可及性的会议主题对性工作者特别重要。NSWP成员通过出席在联合国机构和成员国组织的CSW边会活动,提升了性工作者权利是妇女权利的意识。他们游说国家特派团,参加性工作者组织、盟友和反对派组织的非政府组织边会活动。

内容包括:

Women Radically Transforming a World in Crisis: a framework for Beijing+25

In August 2019, a group of feminist activists from diverse regions and social movements gathered in Mexico City to strategise towards the 25th anniversary of the UN Fourth World Conference on Women, which was held in China in 1995 and produced the Beijing Platform for Action.

Reviewing Sex Worker-led Organisations’ Use of International Guidelines

This case study is the third of five case studies that will be published on a yearly basis from 2016-2020. These case studies will monitor and document the impact of international guidelines and policies on sex work that NSWP and NSWP members have helped develop. NSWP will also monitor how members use these international guidelines in local, national and regional advocacy efforts. Examples of international guidelines include the Amnesty International Policy on State Obligations to Respect, Protect, and Fulfil the Human Rights of Sex Workers, the Sex Worker Implementation Tool, and the development of the UN Women policy on sex work.

NSWP at CSW63

NSWP facilitated a delegation from member organisations to attend the 63rd Commission on the Status of Women (CSW). This delegation aimed to amplify the voices of sex workers’ rights advocates in a space where fundamental feminists and abolitionist groups often dominate discussions about sex work, which do not reflect the diversity of sex workers’ lived experiences and realities. In this context, the conflation of trafficking and sex work is used to promote policies that undermine the rights of sex workers.

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République démocratique du Congo: Rapport Alternatif au Comité CEDAW

Ce rapport parallèle a été soumis par les organisations dirigées par des travailleurSEs du sexe congolaises UMANDE et ACODHU-TS pendant la 73e session du CEDAW qui s’est tenue en juin et juillet 2019.

Mozambique CEDAW Shadow Report

Sex workers in Mozambique experience high levels and multiple forms of violence. Despite constant dialogue with the Government, the police act as protectors of sex workers, but they can also be perpetrators of violence. The relationship between sex workers and health unit professionals can also be problematic. This shadow report, submitted by sex worker-led Mozambican organisation Tiyane Vavasate Association during the 73rd CEDAW Session, which took place June-July 2019, highlights these issues.

Botswana CEDAW Shadow Report

Sisonke-Botswana and Botswana Network on Ethics, Law and HIV and AIDS (BONELA) submitted this shadow report during the 72nd CEDAW Session, which took place February-March 2019. The report elaborates on the situation of cisgender and transgender women who are sex workers in Botswana. The report focuses the criminalisation of sex work; violence, abuse, and failure to act on reports of violence by police; stigma and discrimination faced by sex workers in accessing health services, and lack of free antiretrovirals for migrants.

Serbia CEDAW Shadow Report

In February 2016, following pressure from fundamental feminist and abolitionist organisations, the Serbian government criminalised the purchase of sexual services through amendments to the Public Law and Order Act. Sex workers were ignored during discussion that preceded the adoption of the law. Selling sex remains criminalised. Criminalisation of the purchase of sexual services in Serbia has increased sex workers’ vulnerability to violence and marginalisation and reduced their access to services. Police continue to perpetrate violence against, extort money from, and ignore reports of violence against sex workers. Fundamental feminist and abolitionist discourse has increased the exclusion of sex workers from the women’s and LGBT organisations in the country.