Regional updates: Europe

Our members are listed on the left or you can click the red umbrellas on the map.

Regional Board Members

Nataliia Isaieva (Legalife-Ukraine), Ukraine.

Dinah de Riquet-Bons (STRASS), France.

Regional Networks

The International Committee for the Rights of Sex Workers in Europe (ICRSE) is a European network of sex workers and allies across Europe and Central Asia. It was formed in 2004 to organise the 2005 European Conference on Sex Work, Human Rights, Labour and Migration and is based in Amsterdam, Netherlands.

The Sex Workers’ Rights Advocacy Network for Central and Eastern Europe and Central Asia (SWAN) is a network of sex workers' groups and civil society. SWAN started in 2006 as a project within Hungarian Civil Liberties Union (HCLU/TASZ) and became an independent organisation in 2012 and is based in Budapest, Hungary.

News articles from Europe region are listed below.

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Today, 17th of December 2014, sex workers, their advocates, allies, friends and families, are gathering around the world to denounce all acts of violence against sex workers.

 

 

17th December 2014 by NSWP

On Wednesday NSWP was invited by the International Community of Women Living with HIV (ICW) to take part in their monthly ICW Members Advocacy Working Group. Anastacia, NSWP Policy Officer and Daisy Nakato, WONETHA Director, were invited to lead the discussion on sex workers’ rights in the context of HIV. 

14th November 2014 by NSWP

The Andrey Rylkov Foundation released the following press release:

Press Release

28th April 2014 by NSWP

In response to the open letter to AWID published by the National Organisation for Women’s Shelters and Young Women’s Shelters, the Swedish Association of Women’s Shelters and Young Women’s Empowerment Canters and the Swedish Women’s Lobby, AWID restates their support for sex worker rights organisations and their allies in calling

13th March 2014 by NSWP

The Human Trafficking and Exploitation Bill proposed by Lord Morrow currently being considered in Northern Ireland could, if passed into law, usefully place support for victims of human trafficking on a statutory basis and amalgamate some existing legislation into one single Act. The Bill includes a clause that recommends the criminalisation of the purchase of sex to reduce demand for trafficking.

10th March 2014 by NSWP

The Global Network of Sex Work Projects (NSWP) have released a statement strongly condemning the recent EU Parliament vote on the flawed report prepared by MEP Mary Honeyball.

6th March 2014 by NSWP

In 2012 during the International AIDS Conference in Washington, DC, Carol Leigh from Bayswan met and interviewed Petite Jasmine with Pye Jakobbson from Rose Alliance of Sweden. Petite Jasmine was murdered one year later, a victim of the stigmatisation and legal discrimination that sex workers face.

25th February 2014 by NSWP

La Strada International (LSI), the European NGO Network against Trafficking in Human Beings, and its partners in the LSI NGO platform – who are united against trafficking in human beings, have issued a statement strongly opposing the report by the FEMM committee that was drafted by Mary Honeyball. The report on ‘sexual exploitation and prostitution and its impact on gender equality’ calls for the so-called ‘Swedish Model’.

24th February 2014 by NSWP

Human rights activists in Kyrgyzstan are concerned that a new police department tasked with combating human trafficking is forcing sex workers in the capital to undergo testing for sexually transmitted diseases.

Police in Bishkek have set up a new unit to tackle sexual exploitation and to monitor businesses suspected of running 'prostitution rings'. Numerous of these establishments have been raided since the unit was set up in November of last year.

18th February 2014 by NSWP

Colectivo Hetaira released the following manifesto on the 6th of February 2014.

Madrid sex workers and Colectivo Hetaira denounce the increasingly precarious conditions in which we are carrying out our work, due to regulations and laws that punish prostitutes who get their clients in the street while favoring the owners of big clubs -forcing us to work in those places where there are no laws to protect our rights, since prostitution is not recognized as work.

11th February 2014 by NSWP